The Misguided Theology of Acquiescence


Oft has the phrase been heard, spoken in warning: “If you’re too heavenly minded, you’re no earthly good.” No doubt, this has some merit for those who drift into super-spiritual, religious pretensions, claiming mystical preoccupations unfounded in any real experience with God.

However, by-and-large, the assertion is total bunk.

Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth” (Col 3:2)

The most good you will ever be on earth is when you are thoroughly heavenly minded, heavenly seated, and heavenly inspired. The “heaven talk” of prayer is the currency of earthly transformation—personal, corporate, territorial, societal and political. To disengage from this reality is to subscribe to a theology of acquiescence. When we engage God in conversation and friendship, we are touched with disturbing clarity by the difference between His reality and ours. These visitations cause a groan within us, that we might bridge that gap and see our world become more like His. And make no mistake, though it is His plan, power and authority, it is our job.

“Now in putting everything in subjection to him (man), he left nothing outside his control. At present, we do not yet see everything in subjection to him” (Heb. 2:8)

There it is, the gap. Such is intercession. War and glory. Instead of acquiescence, this is the theology of engagement, laying siege to the beachheads of history. Motivation for this is stored up in heavenly places, hidden in Christ. You can’t fight these battles, seated on earth, and win.

Be heavenly minded. Live with a spirit of revelation upon you. If you don’t already, ask for it. Go there, stay there, live there. Then live here with fuel to burn.

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